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For some years now, Apple has surprised us by hosting

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Intro to GCC and the recent decision:

The law issued in December 1992 brought to life the GCC Patent Office, which officially started accepting applications in October 1998, approximately 6 years after its establishment. This type

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It is that time of year again-back to school time. Whether your student is excited or dreadful of

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The great pizza wars of 2021 are not what you might expect. While the courts will never be able to resolve the question of who (or

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Saudi Arabia
September 2021

The Saudi Authority for Intellectual Property (SAIP) announced the transfer of the jurisdiction of the Trademark Enforcement from the Ministry of Commerce to the Authority in accordance with

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Industry News

Health Policy Watch – Continuing The IP-Watch Tradition Of Vibrant Health Reporting

Following today’s announcement of a one-year pause on IP-Watch reporting, we invite all IP-Watch readers to sign up here for free daily, weekly or monthly news bulletins from our sister publication, Health Policy Watch, which will include health-related IP reporting as part of its portfolio. You can follow Health Policy Watch (www.healthpolicy-watch.org) on Twitter @HealthPolicyW.

Industry News

Transition At IP-Watch: A New Path Forward

Dear Readers, After 15 years of original, independent, thoughtful, and timely reporting on global policymaking from the inside, Intellectual Property Watch (IP-Watch) is announcing today a pause on reporting services as it embarks on a transition phase to devise new strategies for future work.

Industry News

Inside Views: Everything Is Obvious

Ryan Abbott writes: For more than sixty years, “obviousness” has set the bar for patentability.  Under this standard, if a hypothetical “person having ordinary skill in the art” would find an invention obvious in light of existing relevant information, then the invention cannot be patented.  This skilled person is defined as a non-innovative worker with a limited knowledge-base.  The more creative and informed the skilled person, the more likely an invention will be considered obvious.  The standard has evolved since its introduction, and it is now on the verge of an evolutionary leap: Inventive machines are increasingly being used in research, and once the use of such machines becomes standard, the person skilled in the art should be a person using an inventive machine, or just an inventive machine.  Unlike the skilled person, the inventive machine is capable of innovation and considering the entire universe of prior art.  As inventive machines continue to improve, this will increasingly raise the bar to patentability, eventually rendering innovative activities obvious.  The end of obviousness means the end of patents, at least as they are now.

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